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Posts tagged: Internet

piscula:

"this is the internet, i can say whatever i want" is a super creepy and obvious way to say "when there are no obvious consequences for my actions i lack all empathy"

My computer just crapped out on me and I lost ALL MY TABS!

NOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!

Actually this might be a good thing…

artandsciencejournal:

The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

CollegeHumor explains Net Neutrality

collegehumor:

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I’m Adam.

-And I’m Emily.

We make “funny videos” on the Internet.

-But soon, we might not be able to.

That’s because…

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…net neutrality is in jeopardy. Net Neutrality is the principle that says ISPs can’t discriminate between different types of traffic.

That means that…

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…whether you’re a bedroom music producer, a couple on an amateur porn site, or just someone with a start up idea - you get access to the same users as Netflix, Facebook or Amazon. On the Internet, anyone can succeed.

But…

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…America’s ISPs wanna set up a pay-for-play system where rich companies pay extra to get to those users first.

If this happens…

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…instead of a wonderful playground if innovation that it is now, the Internet will become like cable TV where you can only get stuff that’s been pre-approved by a bunch of old rich guys.

Ten years from now…

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…your Internet bill could be a bigger “fustercluck” than your cable bill.

Now, you might be thinking…

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…isn’t the government supposed to protect me from fragrant doucheholery like this?

Unfortunately…

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…the former chairman of the FCC (government agency that’s SUPPOSED to protect you) is now the cable industry’s head lobbyist. And another former cable industry lobbyist is now the CURRENT head of the FCC.

So…

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…we can’t trust the FCC to make the right decision on their own. That’s why WE need to protect the Internet we love. The chaotic, AWESOME, often quite weird, place where literally everyone’s voice can be heard.

In a few months…

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…the FCC will approve this festering soal of proposal unless we speak up. The Internet is one of the few places where human voices speak louder than money. So while that’s still the case, let’s use those voices. Go to DEARFCC.ORG and tell them to protect Net Neutrality. Thanks for doing your part to protect the Internet.

—-

Contact FCC at https://dearfcc.org/

IF DEARFCC.ORG IS DOWN, simply go to good old http://www.savetheinternet.com/

All GIFS are courtesy of our new friend, RANDY!

—-

Source Video

PLEASE REBLOG Last chance to save Net Neutrality

mostlysignssomeportents:

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There’s only 36 hours left comment on the FCC’s proposal to allow for Net Neutrality-shredding “Internet fast lanes” that let phone companies to pick Internet winners and losers—it’s time to act.

Read more…

2014 is not a good year to be a teenage girl. The last of the 90’s kids are growing up and we are starting to see the effects of being raised with the Internet. For generations before us, hormonal teenage boys looking for sexy images of women had limited options; they could brave the embarrassment of going to the counter and buying Playboy, they could look through their sister’s Cosmo or they could use their imagination. Porn today has rid itself of the embarrassment-factor by embracing the anonymity of the World Wide Web; Playboy isn’t really considered to be porn anymore, the real stuff lives in your phone, on your laptop, your tablet; it is available anywhere, anytime at the touch of a button. In fact this very website receives a steady stream of hits that result from someone googling some combination of ‘housekeeping porn’ + ‘sex’, ‘lesbian’ and/or ‘rape’. As you read this, somewhere there is an eleven-year-old boy curiously typing ‘porn’ into Google, probably hoping to see some big boobies. Fast forward a couple of years and he is masturbating to a video of a crying woman who is being tied down, simultaneously penetrated by three men, spanked, and being called a whore. Young boys are being de-sensitized to violence and the more they consume, the more abusive, the more graphic the porn has to be to excite them.
Clara Bennathan, Violence, Teenagers, and Gonzo Porn (via handinabriefcase)

As someone whose understand of sex/women was massively skewed by the internet back when I was 12-18 I can shamefully say this is 100% true.

dduane:

argentknights:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

argentknights:

ya’ll remember the whole petition about net neutrality? yeah. it’s dead. 

We’re really, really fucking this up.
But we can fix it, I swear. We just have to start telling each other the truth. Not the doublespeak bullshit of regulators and lobbyists, but the actual truth. Once we have the truth, we have the power — the power to demand better not only from our government, but from the companies that serve us as well. “This is a political fight,” says Craig Aaron, president of the advocacy group Free Press. “When the internet speaks with a unified voice politicians rip their hair out.”
We can do it. Let’s start.
read the full article here

please please PLEASE HELP RESTORE THE INTERNET!! THE WAR IS ONLY STARTING BUT WE CAN DO THIS. WE ARE THE INTERNET. WE CAN WIN!

Oh for God’s sakes, take the two seconds to sign the damn thing. Every single one of you knows that if you didn’t have the same level of Internet access that you have right now, you would lose your mind. Think about how much time you spend on here. Think about what you do. You’ve gotten used to being able to communicate with people who are hundreds or thousands of miles away from you. You’ve gotten used to doing your coursework online and e-mailing your professors and applying for jobs and ordering food and arguing about Sailor Moon. You need to try and save it.

so what can you do to help, basically? well for one you can sign this petition congresswoman chellie pingree put out, which would stop the comcast/time warner cable companies from merging and basically stopping services like netflix and hulu, blocking certain sights and having a very very BAD effect on the internet + net neutrality. 
you can also help by signal boosting this post and signing it also.
a very very good thing you can do that would benefit would to either call or email this man right here shown in the picture above, telling him to restore net neutrality. telling him to help make the internet for the people, and not for the companies to control. 
thank you for taking time out of your day to help this!!!

Reminding those of you in the US who’re dealing with this problem: if you don’t speak out, you will have NO ONE BUT YOURSELVES TO BLAME when things start to go more seriously to shit. Go make your voices heard. It’s not like you exactly have to walk to Washington DC to do it.

dduane:

argentknights:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

argentknights:

ya’ll remember the whole petition about net neutrality? yeah. it’s dead. 

We’re really, really fucking this up.

But we can fix it, I swear. We just have to start telling each other the truth. Not the doublespeak bullshit of regulators and lobbyists, but the actual truth. Once we have the truth, we have the power — the power to demand better not only from our government, but from the companies that serve us as well. “This is a political fight,” says Craig Aaron, president of the advocacy group Free Press. “When the internet speaks with a unified voice politicians rip their hair out.”

We can do it. Let’s start.

read the full article here

please please PLEASE HELP RESTORE THE INTERNET!! THE WAR IS ONLY STARTING BUT WE CAN DO THIS. WE ARE THE INTERNET. WE CAN WIN!

Oh for God’s sakes, take the two seconds to sign the damn thing. Every single one of you knows that if you didn’t have the same level of Internet access that you have right now, you would lose your mind. Think about how much time you spend on here. Think about what you do. You’ve gotten used to being able to communicate with people who are hundreds or thousands of miles away from you. You’ve gotten used to doing your coursework online and e-mailing your professors and applying for jobs and ordering food and arguing about Sailor Moon. You need to try and save it.

so what can you do to help, basically? well for one you can sign this petition congresswoman chellie pingree put out, which would stop the comcast/time warner cable companies from merging and basically stopping services like netflix and hulu, blocking certain sights and having a very very BAD effect on the internet + net neutrality. 

you can also help by signal boosting this post and signing it also.

a very very good thing you can do that would benefit would to either call or email this man right here shown in the picture above, telling him to restore net neutrality. telling him to help make the internet for the people, and not for the companies to control. 

thank you for taking time out of your day to help this!!!

Reminding those of you in the US who’re dealing with this problem: if you don’t speak out, you will have NO ONE BUT YOURSELVES TO BLAME when things start to go more seriously to shit.

Go make your voices heard. It’s not like you exactly have to walk to Washington DC to do it.

shwlg:

The internet just changed: Net Neutrality is dead.

youkaiyume:

lizwuzthere:

feigenbaumsworld:

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Last Wednesday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced a proposal for new rules that would allow for a “ fast lane” of Internet traffic for content providers who are willing (and able) to pay a fee. [1] The proposal reverses the FCC’s previous commitment to net neutrality and open internet and allows ISP’s like Comcast or Verizon to slow down and censor services that don’t pay the toll.

We have to be totally honest, this situation is seriously grim. But there is still hope. The FCC already knows that the Internet community wants net neutrality, but they think they can put their spin on these new rules and sneak them through. If we can prove them wrong right now with a massive public outcry, we can literally save the Internet once again.

We need to stop the FCC now. Big business groups are already ramping up lobbying efforts with the FCC in swarms since Wednesday’s announcement in support of censoring the open Internet and to ensure this dangerous proposal moves forward. [2]

This is a critical moment. In the last few weeks more than 65,000 people have taken action with us. Can you help us get to 80,000 by the end of the day today?

[1] Gautham Nagesh. “FCC to Propose New ‘Net Neutrality’ Rules”.
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304518704579519963416350296

[2] Edward Wyatt. Edward Wyatt. “Lobbying Efforts Intensify After F.C.C. Tries 3rd Time on Net Neutrality” http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/25/business/lobbying-efforts-intensify-after-fcc-tries-3rd-time-on-net-neutrality.html?hpw&rref=politics

 

Here’s some extra (also important) information:

The chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, was previously a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry. This revolving door our government has with large corporations and their lobbyists is what leads to these kind of policy disasters which crush the competition of big businesses and devastate our individual freedoms.
Net Neutrality is important. Very VERY important.
But it’s just going to keep coming under fire again and again unless we address the underlying problem and that is the corrupting influence of money in our politics. 28th Amendment, anyone?

Having said that SIGN THE PETITION. We gotta do what we can at the moment.

They keep trying to find new ways to go around net neutrality—redefining it or call it something else. We need to show them that we won’t be fooled and we won’t stand for it! Sign the petition! All you need to input is your email! It only takes 3 seconds, you don’t need to register for anything, and it could save the internet experience you know and love and the future that could affect you in ways you don’t even know yet.

SIGN HERE

Can someone tell me what “popularprizes.sampleclover.eu” is and why it pops up every no and then for no good reason when I try to visit certain blogs on tumblr. I literally can’t go to alexsmallbutera.tumblr.com without instead getting this mostly blank site shoved in my face that tells me I should fill out a survey of some kind about “visitor’s experience”. IT DOESN’T MENTION A SITE. However it does have a big “Thank YOU” as banner, with the “You” in the YouTube font…

I can’t even find anything about it on Google. Anyone heard of this shit?

Turns out that I was looking at the wrong URL, just normal alexbutera.tumblr.com works (I R DUMP). I still find this other site really weird though?

silviowilma:

The US government has betrayed the internet. We need to take it back

 The NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. We engineers built the internet – and now we have to fix it
Bruce Schneier - The Guardian, Thursday 5 September 2013 15.04 EDT
Government and industry have betrayed the internet, and us.
By subverting the internet at every level to make it a vast, multi-layered and robust surveillance platform, the NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. The companies that build and manage our internet infrastructure, the companies that create and sell us our hardware and software, or the companies that host our data: we can no longer trust them to be ethical internet stewards.
This is not the internet the world needs, or the internet its creators envisioned. We need to take it back.
And by we, I mean the engineering community.
Yes, this is primarily a political problem, a policy matter that requires political intervention.
But this is also an engineering problem, and there are several things engineers can – and should – do.
One, we should expose. If you do not have a security clearance, and if you have not received a National Security Letter, you are not bound by a federal confidentially requirements or a gag order. If you have been contacted by the NSA to subvert a product or protocol, you need to come forward with your story. Your employer obligations don’t cover illegal or unethical activity. If you work with classified data and are truly brave, expose what you know. We need whistleblowers.
We need to know how exactly how the NSA and other agencies are subverting routers, switches, the internet backbone, encryption technologies and cloud systems. I already have five stories from people like you, and I’ve just started collecting. I want 50. There’s safety in numbers, and this form of civil disobedience is the moral thing to do.
Two, we can design. We need to figure out how to re-engineer the internet to prevent this kind of wholesale spying. We need new techniques to prevent communications intermediaries from leaking private information.
We can make surveillance expensive again. In particular, we need open protocols, open implementations, open systems – these will be harder for the NSA to subvert.
The Internet Engineering Task Force, the group that defines the standards that make the internet run, has a meeting planned for early November in Vancouver. This group needs to dedicate its next meeting to this task. This is an emergency, and demands an emergency response.
Three, we can influence governance. I have resisted saying this up to now, and I am saddened to say it, but the US has proved to be an unethical steward of the internet. The UK is no better. The NSA's actions are legitimizing the internet abuses by China, Russia, Iran and others. We need to figure out new means of internet governance, ones that makes it harder for powerful tech countries to monitor everything. For example, we need to demand transparency, oversight, and accountability from our governments and corporations.
Unfortunately, this is going play directly into the hands of totalitarian governments that want to control their country’s internet for even more extreme forms of surveillance. We need to figure out how to prevent that, too. We need to avoid the mistakes of the International Telecommunications Union, which has become a forum to legitimize bad government behavior, and create truly international governance that can’t be dominated or abused by any one country.
Generations from now, when people look back on these early decades of the internet, I hope they will not be disappointed in us. We can ensure that they don’t only if each of us makes this a priority, and engages in the debate. We have a moral duty to do this, and we have no time to lose.
Dismantling the surveillance state won’t be easy. Has any country that engaged in mass surveillance of its own citizens voluntarily given up that capability? Has any mass surveillance country avoided becoming totalitarian? Whatever happens, we’re going to be breaking new ground.
Again, the politics of this is a bigger task than the engineering, but the engineering is critical. We need to demand that real technologists be involved in any key government decision making on these issues. We’ve had enough of lawyers and politicians not fully understanding technology; we need technologists at the table when we build tech policy.
To the engineers, I say this: we built the internet, and some of us have helped to subvert it. Now, those of us who love liberty have to fix it.

silviowilma:

The US government has betrayed the internet. We need to take it back

The NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. We engineers built the internet – and now we have to fix it

- The Guardian, Thursday 5 September 2013 15.04 EDT

Government and industry have betrayed the internet, and us.

By subverting the internet at every level to make it a vast, multi-layered and robust surveillance platform, the NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. The companies that build and manage our internet infrastructure, the companies that create and sell us our hardware and software, or the companies that host our data: we can no longer trust them to be ethical internet stewards.

This is not the internet the world needs, or the internet its creators envisioned. We need to take it back.

And by we, I mean the engineering community.

Yes, this is primarily a political problem, a policy matter that requires political intervention.

But this is also an engineering problem, and there are several things engineers can – and should – do.

One, we should expose. If you do not have a security clearance, and if you have not received a National Security Letter, you are not bound by a federal confidentially requirements or a gag order. If you have been contacted by the NSA to subvert a product or protocol, you need to come forward with your story. Your employer obligations don’t cover illegal or unethical activity. If you work with classified data and are truly brave, expose what you know. We need whistleblowers.

We need to know how exactly how the NSA and other agencies are subverting routers, switches, the internet backbone, encryption technologies and cloud systems. I already have five stories from people like you, and I’ve just started collecting. I want 50. There’s safety in numbers, and this form of civil disobedience is the moral thing to do.

Two, we can design. We need to figure out how to re-engineer the internet to prevent this kind of wholesale spying. We need new techniques to prevent communications intermediaries from leaking private information.

We can make surveillance expensive again. In particular, we need open protocols, open implementations, open systems – these will be harder for the NSA to subvert.

The Internet Engineering Task Force, the group that defines the standards that make the internet run, has a meeting planned for early November in Vancouver. This group needs to dedicate its next meeting to this task. This is an emergency, and demands an emergency response.

Three, we can influence governance. I have resisted saying this up to now, and I am saddened to say it, but the US has proved to be an unethical steward of the internet. The UK is no better. The NSA's actions are legitimizing the internet abuses by China, Russia, Iran and others. We need to figure out new means of internet governance, ones that makes it harder for powerful tech countries to monitor everything. For example, we need to demand transparency, oversight, and accountability from our governments and corporations.

Unfortunately, this is going play directly into the hands of totalitarian governments that want to control their country’s internet for even more extreme forms of surveillance. We need to figure out how to prevent that, too. We need to avoid the mistakes of the International Telecommunications Union, which has become a forum to legitimize bad government behavior, and create truly international governance that can’t be dominated or abused by any one country.

Generations from now, when people look back on these early decades of the internet, I hope they will not be disappointed in us. We can ensure that they don’t only if each of us makes this a priority, and engages in the debate. We have a moral duty to do this, and we have no time to lose.

Dismantling the surveillance state won’t be easy. Has any country that engaged in mass surveillance of its own citizens voluntarily given up that capability? Has any mass surveillance country avoided becoming totalitarian? Whatever happens, we’re going to be breaking new ground.

Again, the politics of this is a bigger task than the engineering, but the engineering is critical. We need to demand that real technologists be involved in any key government decision making on these issues. We’ve had enough of lawyers and politicians not fully understanding technology; we need technologists at the table when we build tech policy.

To the engineers, I say this: we built the internet, and some of us have helped to subvert it. Now, those of us who love liberty have to fix it.